How to Clean Vintage Pyrex

Vintage Pyrex
These classic patterns retained their vibrant colors, but be careful with cleansers containing harsh chemicals.

It’s a testament to the durability of classic Corning Ware /Pyrex dishes that you can still find relatively undamaged pieces purchased more than 50 years ago. Just as impressive is their resistance to permanent stains. While chips or cracks can’t be undone, dark stains from baking or scratches from silverware often can be removed with a little effort. I’ve purchased many pieces that looked pretty beat up on the shelf but that cleaned up nicely after I brought them home.

Vintage Pyrex and Corning Ware dishes are consistent best sellers in my vintage Etsy shop. Customers often tell me that classic patterns from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s remind them of their childhoods and baking in their mother’s kitchens. The classic Cornflower Blue casserole dish, for example, was once chiefly valued by the home cook for its durable construction and versatility. While we still value its practicality, we also love its midcentury style. Collectors of vintage Pyrex now proudly display their latest acquisitions and seek out rare sizes and patterns to round out their collection.

Vintage Pyrex cornflower blue
Corning Ware Petite Pans in the classic Cornflower Blue pattern.

Below are some of the cleaning methods I’ve used and found to be effective. Before you try any of these suggestions, first wash your Pyrex in warm soapy water using a mild dish detergent. I use Palmolive, which is inexpensive and very good at cutting grease. After a gentle washing, dry the piece and examine it for marks to see if you need to take tougher measures. If so, try one or several of the following:

 1. Mr. Clean Magic Erasers. I have come to find these little white sponges indispensable. They don’t last as long as regular sponges but you can buy them in bulk at Costco for a fairly reasonable price. The manufacturer attributes their power to a mix of chemicals that act as microscrubbers when activated by water. I’ve found them to be very effective for removing dark spots and silverware marks. However, use these with caution on your patterned dishes as too much scrubbing could cause colors to fade.
Pyrex grab it bowls
Vintage Grab-It bowls usually fly off the shelves as soon as I list them. It’s hard to find them with lids but it occasionally happens. These cleaned up nicely.

2. Barkeeper’s Friend. I started using this product after reading about it on Pyrex Love, a wonderful resource for researching vintage Pyrex patterns and related topics. I started with the liquid form but now prefer the powdered variety that comes in a can similar to the one used for Comet. It’s inexpensive and can be purchased on Amazon. As noted by Pyrex Love, this product is particularly good for removing metal marks. Personally, I have found this to be true. It’s helped me to remove seemingly intractable dark metal marks that wouldn’t even fade using regular dish detergent or the magic eraser. Pyrex Love cautions not to use BF on the colored or gold leaf portions of Pyrex patterns. It’s probably wise to use caution; however I’ve tried it on all types of Pyrex pieces without any problem. Just use common sense and don’t scrub too hard or soak too long. All of these products have chemicals that could possibly affect the color or finish of your piece if overused.

Pyrex cinderella bowl
A Pyrex Cinderella Bowl in the Spring Blossom pattern introduced in the 1970s.
Vintage pyrex bowl
A Pyrex Cinderella bowl with the Americana pattern from the 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Baking Soda. This is an old standby when it comes to removing any type of stain. When stuck as to how to get rid of a stain, I often try a little baking soda mixed with a little water (about 3 parts soda to 1 part water). I usually pat a little of the solution on the stained area and wait a minute or so, then gently rub it off and rinse. I’m not sure why, but it sometimes works when other methods fail.

Petite Pans from the 1970s in the Spice of Life pattern.

In addition to the above, I’ve also used toothpicks or tiny straight pins to get baked-in food out of crevices. Of course, you have to be gentle and very careful not to leave scratches.

There are also a few things you SHOULD NOT try. Harsh cleansers such as Comet contain bleach which can lead to fading over time. Similarly, do not regularly put your Pyrex into the dishwasher if you want the colors to remain vibrant. Pyrex Love also cautions against heating a Pyrex dish on the stovetop before cleaning it, as some sites apparently have recommended. Although the strategy has worked for some, you risk shattering the glass.

I hope you find these tips useful as you add to your Pyrex collection!

Vintage Corning Ware
Corning Ware made its Centura casserole line briefly in the 1960s-70s.
Vintage Pyrex
A Pyrex dish in the Shenandoah pattern from the 1980s.

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